Vascular dementia

Vascular dementia is described as decline in thinking skills caused by conditions that block or reduce blood flow to the brain, depriving brain cells of vital nutrients and oxygen.
Globally, dementia drugs market is expected to expand at a CAGR of 8.4% during the forecasted period (2018 –2026), due to the introduction of innovative drugs with higher efficacy toward dementia patients and increasing government initiatives to provide better palliative care to patients. Worldwide results reveal that 44 million people suffered with vascular dementia during 2010 and estimated to double every 20 years, to the number 65.7 million in 2030 and 115.4 million in 2050. In 2010, 58% of all people with low or middle incomes were with dementia lived in countries. This proportion expected to increase to 63% in 2030 and 71 per cent in 2050.The proportion are expected to double by 2030 and triple by 2050 to 115 million. Alzheimer’s disease lead to 60-70 % of cases in dementia and second most common condition of dementia is vascular dementia which contributes 20% of cases all over the world.

Target Audience :

Nurses, Doctors, Healthcare professionals,  healthcare workers, researchers, academicians, medical professionals, Psychiatrists, Psychologists, Neurologists, Neurosurgeons, Research scientists, Neuroscience Organizations, Pharmaceutical companies, Neuroscience associations, Professors, Students 

Tags :

Dementia, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Dementia with Lewy bodies, Symptoms and diagnosis of Vascular dementia, Causes, Risk factors associated, Treatment and prevention, Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, Vascular dementia nursing,  Advances in Dementia Diagnosis, Cognitive impairment and dementia,  Cerebrovascular diseases.

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For Program Enquiry: contact@dementiaconferences.org
Sponsors/Exhibitions: dementia@genoteqhealthcare.com
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